Australia cricket

Australia’s cricket team represents Australia in major international competitions, such as the Cricket World Cup, and in the three main forms of international cricket: the Cricket Test, the One-day International (ODI) and the Twenty20 international.

She is under the patronage of Cricket Australia, the cricket governing body in Australia. She is considered one of the best national selections in the world by her record and statistics against each of the selections she has faced. She is the only national team to win five Cricket World Cups and the only one to win three times in a row, raising the trophy in 1987, 1999, 2003 and 2007 and 2015.

She played the first test-match in the history of cricket against England in 1877 at the Melbourne Cricket Ground (MCG) of Melbourne, and the first One-day International (ODI) against the same opponents in 1971. She meets regularly other world-class nations in play series, including the Ashes, played on average every two years against England, its main rival.

In Cricket Test, Australians wear the traditional white uniforms common to all national teams, and on which there is no distinguishing number. Only the helmet distinguishes them: it is usually dark green for Australia.

In one-day cricket, the white was also de rigueur until the late 1980s. In 1977, an unofficial cricket league was created in Australia: the World Series Cricket, which brings together teams representing Australia, West Indies and the rest of the world. The Australian Cricket Board and the international authorities reject the competition and the players participating in it until it stops in 1979 and none of its matches are officially recognized, but it will have a considerable influence on the world cricket. It is especially during this one that colored outfits are introduced for the first time. The team of Australian players plays in yellow, the color usually used by Australian national teams in the various team sports.

When the World Series Cup was officially created in 1979 to succeed the World Series Cricket, the idea of ​​using color jerseys was resumed. It was during the first match of this competition, played on November 27, 1979 at the Sydney Cricket Ground against the West Indies, that the team of Australia sports a yellow and green jersey. Australians will use these two colors for all their ODI and depending on the season, one or the other color predominates on the jersey. The World Cup matches were an exception until 1992, when colored jerseys were only introduced that year, during the edition co-organized by Australia and New Zealand. Currently, Australian jerseys are provided by Adidas.

The first helmets for drummers were also introduced by the World Series Cricket85 during the 1977-78 season and very quickly adopted during official matches.

The Australian cricketers who have the chance to play at least one test-match are given a green cap, the Baggy Green, and this since the first test of the history of cricket, in 1877. This cap has long been a symbol of national pride in Australia.

Respect for the baggy green has always been high, but he grew up again in the 1990s, thanks to the efforts of captains Mark Taylor and Steve Waugh. The latter supported the idea that honouring the cricket traditions was an essential element of a team’s success.

The baggy green was originally part of the equipment of the players, and a new cap was usually given to the players before each tour. In the 1990s and at the instigation of Steve Waugh, an unofficial practice began to emerge among the players: never to replace his baggy green. Although there is no rule about replacing a cap by Cricket Australia, it never happens again, the damaged state of baggy green becoming de facto a symbol of experience among players of the team.

When he was a captain, Taylor set up a pre-match ceremony where a new entrant received his baggy green from a player in the same specialty. This ceremony continued under the captaincy of Waugh and currently Ricky Ponting. Another tradition introduced by Taylor and that continues also is the obligation for all players to wear the baggy green during the first session where the team is fielding during each match, symbolizing their solidarity. Even Shane Warne, known for his preference for the hat, observed this tradition. On the other hand, Australian players rarely wear baggy green when they are beating: helmet use has become widespread.

Some baggy greens sold at auction have reached impressive amounts: the one worn by Donald Bradman during his last international season in 1948 was sold 425 000 Australian dollars in 2003, and the cap of Keith Miller for the 1953 season left for 35 000 A $. Another Bradman cap was sold for 90,000 to $ 92. Baggy greens of lesser-known players snapped up for sums of around A $ 10,000

At home, Australia has already met their opponents in nine different stages. The six stadiums of Australian first-class cricket teams are those that are used on a regular basis, whether in Cricket Test or ODI. They are distributed in each of the six Australian states. Sydney’s Sydney Cricket Ground, Adelaide’s Adelaide Oval and Melbourne’s Melbourne Cricket Ground (MCG) have been in use since the late 19th century. It was in the latter that was played the first test-match in the history of cricket. Since 1980, it hosts every year the Boxing Day Test, test-match that begins December 26 and involves Australia and the nation on tour in Australia during the austral summer.

The Brisbane Cricket Ground100 in Brisbane and the W.A.C.A Ground in Perth hosted their first test in 1931 and 1970 respectively. These two stadiums and the three previous ones each host a match of the Ashes when this competition takes place in Australia.

The Hobart Bellerive Oval has been used regularly since it hosted its first ODI in 1988.

These six stadiums also hosted matches of the 1992 Cricket World Cup, which Australia co-hosted with New Zealand and the final was played at the CWM.

Any player of Australian nationality or born in Australia can of course be selected as a team from Australia. The International Cricket Council (ICC) also allows a national team to play foreigners, according to certain rules established in 2006. In particular, the Australian team can do a player having spent at least 183 days a year for four years in Australia without being selected by his country of origin. The player must also not have played for his home country during the same period, unless he is an associate or affiliate member of the ICC. Before 2003, this rule applied even to this type of players.

The current team includes, for example, Andrew Symonds, born in England to parents from the West Indies. He chose to wear the Australian jersey and refused to represent England pending his qualification.

Any player of Australian nationality or born in Australia can of course be selected as a team from Australia. The International Cricket Council (ICC) also allows a national team to play foreigners, according to certain rules established in 2006. In particular, the Australian team can do a player having spent at least 183 days a year for four years in Australia without being selected by his country of origin. The player must also not have played for his home country during the same period, unless he is an associate or affiliate member of the ICC. Before 2003, this rule applied even to this type of players.

The current team includes, for example, Andrew Symonds, born in England to parents from the West Indies. He chose to wear the Australian jersey and refused to represent England pending his qualification.

Former captain of the Australian team, Bob Simpson is the first coach. He is named in 1986. He recovers a team which, at the time, is very inefficient. During his ten years as head of the team, the Australians won the 1987 World Cup and won the Ashes against the England team and the Frank Worrell Trophy against the West Indies, but failed in the first round. 1992 World Cup and lost in the final of the 1996 edition. Geoff Marsh, also a former international, succeeds Marsh in 1996. He won the 1999 World Cup and keeps the Ashes for the duration of his contract.

The next two coaches have never been international. John Buchanan leads the team after the 1999 World Cup, and wins the next two, in 2003 and 2007. In 2007, former team player Tim Nielsen of South Australia, who inherits of the post. It stops in 2011.

The successive coaches are not part of the team’s selection committee since 1994, when the captain, Mark Taylor, considers that Bob Simpson has too much influence over Australian cricket, until 2011. That year, South African Mickey Arthur, former coach of the South African team and then head of Western Australia, became the first foreigner to lead the Australian team. Coach, member of the selection committee, he must also supervise training methods in different states. Licensed in 2013, he is replaced by former international Darren Lehmann

The first test-game radio broadcasts of the Australian team took place during the 1924-1925 season at the Ashes games played at the Sydney Cricket Ground. They take place on a local Sydney radio station, 2BL Sydney. Among the commentators is the former international Clem Hill. The first throw-thrown commentary takes place in December 1925 during a game between Australia and a selection of the rest of Australia, still in Sydney and on the same station. For the Ashes of 1930, contested in England, the Australian radio commentators innovate by creating a technique called “synthetic cricket” to broadcast the matches: remained in Australia, they receive by cable and in real time details about the course of the match, the relate as if they are in the stadium. The mood is simulated through crowd effects, note. The BBC premieres the first television broadcast of a cricket match at the match-test at Lord’s, London in June 1938 between Australia and England.

Since the end of the World Series Cricket (WSC) in 1979, the television rights of the Australia team, previously owned by the ABC, are held by Channel Nine for home games. The question of these rights had been the cause of the creation of the WSC by the magnate Kerry Packer. Cricket Australia announced on May 11, 2005 that the contract with Channel Nine, which was due to expire in 2006, had been extended until 2013. If the amount of this contract was not disclosed, the previous contract, covering the period 1999-2006, was worth $ 25 million to $ 30 million a year to Cricket Australia.

Since the 2006-07 Ashes, Cricket Australia has also broadcast summaries of Australian international games on its own website

Cricket is, with swimming, Australian football, golf, football, rugby league and rugby, one of the most popular sports in Australia. A study conducted in 2007 placed it at the top of the sports that most interested Australians, in front of swimming.

Australian players are recognized and popular: Allan Border (1989), Mark Taylor (1999) and Steve Waugh (2004), for example, were elected Australian of the Year (Australian of the year) 134, while Shane Warne was elected BBC Sports Personality of the Year Overseas Personality (International Sports Personality of the Year) by the BBC in 2005.

Some Australian songs deal specifically with Australian players, for example Bradman136 composed by Paul Kelly in honor of Donald Bradman. Kevin Bloody Wilson’s humorous Shane Warne Song is obviously about Shane Warne. The television series Bodyline138, including Hugo Weaving as English captain Douglas Jardine was first broadcast on Network Ten in 1984. It traces the events related to the test series of 1932-33.

Bradman obviously has a special place. In 1997, he became the first Australian to be represented on a stamp during his lifetime. On his death, in 2001, a 20-cent coin was published in his likeness. He was one of four nominees for the Australian of the Century Australian election, with ophthalmologist Fred Hollows, swimming champion Dawn Fraser and surgeon Victor Chang. Australian Prime Minister John Howard announced that it was the latter who had been chosen.